Storm Photography - I

Published by Caryn Hill on May'28,2017

3 | 784


Storm Photography - I

Caryn Hill
3 | 784 | May 28, 2017

Storm chasing. Some fear it.  Some are confused by it. Some will even think we are crazy for enjoying it.  Fact is, there is nothing that can touch the adrenaline of storm chasing.  It's a never ending battle of staying safe. Avoiding lightning, large hail, muddy roads, flying debris and even sometimes close calls with tornadoes, makes this addiction called storm chasing, an addiction there is no cure for. 

 

Hi, I am a storm chaser and my name is Caryn.  There is no cure for my addiction.  I'll admit it.  I'm not even going to try and stop knowing the dangers involved.  My experiences have taken me from enjoying 10plus super-cell structure to running for my life as it approached at an accelerated speed not predicted and spewing out hail that could leave yet another dozen dents in my vehicle.  I have literally felt the wrath of hail on the bridge of my nose that literally had me on my knees.  The inflow winds have even given me a good excuse to stay in a vehicle where it is safe but my need to feel the power overwhelms me.  This thing called, "Nature" is something to respect but it is also something that tears at my soul to feel.  Feel every rain drop.  Feel the concussion from large hail hitting the top of my vehicle.  Feel the power from RFD as it surges out from behind a super-cell.  Just to feel ALIVE. 

 

This need does go beyond just these feelings though.  It also takes you down a path of hearing.  Hearing things only these severe storms can produce.  The entire world changes when young and old trees alike, start to come apart from high winds and snapping of branches can be heard in the not too far distance.  Hearing the crackle of lightning as it speeds above your head and lands only a short distance from your safe spot.  Hearing that roar as a noisy tornado approaches and then makes a big white ghostly appearance in the darkness of night. Hearing the silence as the birds have taken shelter knowing at any moment their life could change as well.  Hearing the mixed emotions of seeing such power from those that have witnessed it before, to those that have never seen anything like it before in their life.

 

Once you have taken in the sounds of severe weather, stop and smell. The smell of those very leaves being ripped from trees, produce a fragrance not capable of being bottled.  Smell the rain.  Smell the pungent odors of wet dirt from a farmers field that was just pounded with hail.  Smell the moist air as it reeks of humidity and of good things to come and only understood by a storm chaser.  Smell the desert after a good monsoon rain.  There is NOTHING to compare it to.  NOTHING.

 

My 13 years of storm chasing has left me with plenty of stories over the years.  Stories of human nature, ma nature and of those that should be left alone.  Stories that involve the good, the bad and the ugly.  Stories of fate. Stories of bad luck and stories that should only be told around the camp fire or chase van, whichever you prefer.  If you care to join me in my adventure of driving over 350k miles over these 13 years and what I have experienced, please join me as I blog my way through those years.  Fact is, you may find yourself addicted as I hope I make you feel you are right there, in that seat beside me, as we head out on that open road, storm chasing, with cameras and tripods in tow" 

 

Caryn Hill Photography

1728 S. Nutmeg Street

Bennett, Colorado  80102

720.308.6045

FB:  Caryn Hill Photography/Caryn Hill Equine Photography

www.carynhillphotography.com (Severe Weather Photography)

www.carynhill.com  (Event Photography)

www.southwestphotographytours.com

www.silverliningtours.com

https://twitter.com/badwxchick

 


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Sid

Thu Aug 20 16:15:15 2015

Thats a great pre-cursor. Looking forward to the next one soon!


Storm chasing. Some fear it.  Some are confused by it. Some will even think we are crazy for enjoying it.  Fact is, there is nothing that can touch the adrenaline of storm chasing.  It's a never ending battle of staying safe. Avoiding lightning, large hail, muddy roads, flying debris and even sometimes close calls with tornadoes, makes this addiction called storm chasing, an addiction there is no cure for. 

 

Hi, I am a storm chaser and my name is Caryn.  There is no cure for my addiction.  I'll admit it.  I'm not even going to try and stop knowing the dangers involved.  My experiences have taken me from enjoying 10plus super-cell structure to running for my life as it approached at an accelerated speed not predicted and spewing out hail that could leave yet another dozen dents in my vehicle.  I have literally felt the wrath of hail on the bridge of my nose that literally had me on my knees.  The inflow winds have even given me a good excuse to stay in a vehicle where it is safe but my need to feel the power overwhelms me.  This thing called, "Nature" is something to respect but it is also something that tears at my soul to feel.  Feel every rain drop.  Feel the concussion from large hail hitting the top of my vehicle.  Feel the power from RFD as it surges out from behind a super-cell.  Just to feel ALIVE. 

 

This need does go beyond just these feelings though.  It also takes you down a path of hearing.  Hearing things only these severe storms can produce.  The entire world changes when young and old trees alike, start to come apart from high winds and snapping of branches can be heard in the not too far distance.  Hearing the crackle of lightning as it speeds above your head and lands only a short distance from your safe spot.  Hearing that roar as a noisy tornado approaches and then makes a big white ghostly appearance in the darkness of night. Hearing the silence as the birds have taken shelter knowing at any moment their life could change as well.  Hearing the mixed emotions of seeing such power from those that have witnessed it before, to those that have never seen anything like it before in their life.

 

Once you have taken in the sounds of severe weather, stop and smell. The smell of those very leaves being ripped from trees, produce a fragrance not capable of being bottled.  Smell the rain.  Smell the pungent odors of wet dirt from a farmers field that was just pounded with hail.  Smell the moist air as it reeks of humidity and of good things to come and only understood by a storm chaser.  Smell the desert after a good monsoon rain.  There is NOTHING to compare it to.  NOTHING.

 

My 13 years of storm chasing has left me with plenty of stories over the years.  Stories of human nature, ma nature and of those that should be left alone.  Stories that involve the good, the bad and the ugly.  Stories of fate. Stories of bad luck and stories that should only be told around the camp fire or chase van, whichever you prefer.  If you care to join me in my adventure of driving over 350k miles over these 13 years and what I have experienced, please join me as I blog my way through those years.  Fact is, you may find yourself addicted as I hope I make you feel you are right there, in that seat beside me, as we head out on that open road, storm chasing, with cameras and tripods in tow" 

 

Caryn Hill Photography

1728 S. Nutmeg Street

Bennett, Colorado  80102

720.308.6045

FB:  Caryn Hill Photography/Caryn Hill Equine Photography

www.carynhillphotography.com (Severe Weather Photography)

www.carynhill.com  (Event Photography)

www.southwestphotographytours.com

www.silverliningtours.com

https://twitter.com/badwxchick