AGUMBE, Life Under Foot

Published by RAJIV BASU on Nov'22,2017

2 | 183


AGUMBE, Life Under Foot

RAJIV BASU
2 | 183 | Nov 22, 2017

I wanted to visit the Western Ghats for so many months but the plan never materialized. This time it just happened over a long weekend and I happened to visit Agumbe, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

At Agumbe, I stayed at KALINGA CENTER FOR RAINFOREST ECOLOGY, run by Gaurishankar.

Rains were omnipresent and persistent and drizzle led to downpours and the sun finding it difficult to shine through the dark clouds.Trust me, it's not easy to photograph in "Cherrapunji of South"-Agumbe, especially when you are blessed by rain God, keeping an eye 24x7 and blood thirsty day light vampires - leeches.

Common name lynx spider refers to their quickness and agility; lynx-like in nature. They are mainly plant-dwelling spiders, commonly found on grass, shrubs, and trees.

Lynx Spider

Capturing the rich biodiversity required efforts, at times lying flat on the ground, low light, focusing amidst the foliage. 

The Golden eye of Skittering Frog:

The Eye

Green Vine Snake:

Green vine

The horror, the horror: As if Scorpions weren't frightening enough when illuminated by UV rays from a black light, the armored arachnids glow an unnatural neon blue. UV light that hits these creepy crawlies gets converted by proteins in their exoskeletons into the light of a blue hue, which is visible to the human eye.
We spot this inside the common hall of KCRE.

Scorpio

Lastly, I would say a trip to "land of the #Phantoms in the dark", showcasing the wonder that is in the Western Ghats, will keep you enthralled from start to finish.

Blue-eyed bush frog (Philautus Neelanethrus)

Bush frog


This place is a must in the list if you are an avid shutterbug, a nature lover, and a wildlife enthusiast. 

 


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I wanted to visit the Western Ghats for so many months but the plan never materialized. This time it just happened over a long weekend and I happened to visit Agumbe, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

At Agumbe, I stayed at KALINGA CENTER FOR RAINFOREST ECOLOGY, run by Gaurishankar.

Rains were omnipresent and persistent and drizzle led to downpours and the sun finding it difficult to shine through the dark clouds.Trust me, it's not easy to photograph in "Cherrapunji of South"-Agumbe, especially when you are blessed by rain God, keeping an eye 24x7 and blood thirsty day light vampires - leeches.

Common name lynx spider refers to their quickness and agility; lynx-like in nature. They are mainly plant-dwelling spiders, commonly found on grass, shrubs, and trees.

Lynx Spider

Capturing the rich biodiversity required efforts, at times lying flat on the ground, low light, focusing amidst the foliage. 

The Golden eye of Skittering Frog:

The Eye

Green Vine Snake:

Green vine

The horror, the horror: As if Scorpions weren't frightening enough when illuminated by UV rays from a black light, the armored arachnids glow an unnatural neon blue. UV light that hits these creepy crawlies gets converted by proteins in their exoskeletons into the light of a blue hue, which is visible to the human eye.
We spot this inside the common hall of KCRE.

Scorpio

Lastly, I would say a trip to "land of the #Phantoms in the dark", showcasing the wonder that is in the Western Ghats, will keep you enthralled from start to finish.

Blue-eyed bush frog (Philautus Neelanethrus)

Bush frog


This place is a must in the list if you are an avid shutterbug, a nature lover, and a wildlife enthusiast.