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Top 7 props for Food Photography

Published by WPC Official Account on Dec'29,2023

0 | 895


Top 7 props for Food Photography

WPC Official Account
0 | 895 | Feb 24, 2024

  1. Fabric Napkins: Fabric napkins are an essential prop in food photography. They add a soft texture to your photos and can bring in a pop of color to contrast with the food. Napkins can be folded, crumpled, or draped to add a sense of movement and dynamism to your photos. They can also be used to wipe clean any spills or crumbs, ensuring your food always looks its best. 

  2. Matte Plates: Matte plates are a favorite among food photographers. Their non-reflective surface prevents any unwanted glare or reflections, keeping the focus firmly on the food. Matte plates come in a variety of colors and sizes, allowing you to choose the perfect plate to complement your dish. A large matte plate can act as a canvas for your food, while a small matte plate can help to make a small portion of food look more substantial.

  3. Utensils: Utensils such as forks, knives, spoons, and chopsticks are more than just tools for eating. In food photography, they can suggest the act of eating and make the photo more relatable to viewers. A fork piercing a piece of cake, a spoon scooping up a mouthful of soup, or chopsticks picking up a sushi roll can all add a sense of action and anticipation to your photos.

  4. Parchment Paper: Parchment paper is a versatile prop that can be used in a number of ways in food photography. It can be used as a backdrop for a rustic, homemade feel. It can also be used as a liner for baked goods, adding a touch of authenticity to your photos. Crumpled parchment paper can add texture and interest to an otherwise plain surface.

  5. Pinch Bowls: Pinch bowls are small bowls used to hold ingredients. In food photography, they can add depth and interest to your photos. A pinch bowl filled with a vibrant spice or a fresh herb can add a pop of color to your photo. They can also be used to hold ingredients that will be added to the dish in a later step, suggesting the process of cooking.

  6. Herbs and Seasonings: Fresh herbs and seasonings can enhance the visual appeal of your dish. A sprinkle of chopped fresh herbs can suggest freshness and flavor. A dusting of spices can add color and texture. Herbs and seasonings can also be used in the background of your photos, suggesting the flavors within the dish.

  7. Glass Jars and Bottles: Glass jars and bottles can add height and interest to your food photos. A tall bottle of olive oil or a jar of homemade jam can draw the eye upwards, adding a sense of depth to your photo. They can also be used to hold drinks or layered desserts, adding a sense of indulgence to your photos.

Remember, the key to successful food photography is to choose props that complement your food, rather than distract from it. The food is the star of the show, and your props should enhance it, not overshadow it. Happy shooting!


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  1. Fabric Napkins: Fabric napkins are an essential prop in food photography. They add a soft texture to your photos and can bring in a pop of color to contrast with the food. Napkins can be folded, crumpled, or draped to add a sense of movement and dynamism to your photos. They can also be used to wipe clean any spills or crumbs, ensuring your food always looks its best. 

  2. Matte Plates: Matte plates are a favorite among food photographers. Their non-reflective surface prevents any unwanted glare or reflections, keeping the focus firmly on the food. Matte plates come in a variety of colors and sizes, allowing you to choose the perfect plate to complement your dish. A large matte plate can act as a canvas for your food, while a small matte plate can help to make a small portion of food look more substantial.

  3. Utensils: Utensils such as forks, knives, spoons, and chopsticks are more than just tools for eating. In food photography, they can suggest the act of eating and make the photo more relatable to viewers. A fork piercing a piece of cake, a spoon scooping up a mouthful of soup, or chopsticks picking up a sushi roll can all add a sense of action and anticipation to your photos.

  4. Parchment Paper: Parchment paper is a versatile prop that can be used in a number of ways in food photography. It can be used as a backdrop for a rustic, homemade feel. It can also be used as a liner for baked goods, adding a touch of authenticity to your photos. Crumpled parchment paper can add texture and interest to an otherwise plain surface.

  5. Pinch Bowls: Pinch bowls are small bowls used to hold ingredients. In food photography, they can add depth and interest to your photos. A pinch bowl filled with a vibrant spice or a fresh herb can add a pop of color to your photo. They can also be used to hold ingredients that will be added to the dish in a later step, suggesting the process of cooking.

  6. Herbs and Seasonings: Fresh herbs and seasonings can enhance the visual appeal of your dish. A sprinkle of chopped fresh herbs can suggest freshness and flavor. A dusting of spices can add color and texture. Herbs and seasonings can also be used in the background of your photos, suggesting the flavors within the dish.

  7. Glass Jars and Bottles: Glass jars and bottles can add height and interest to your food photos. A tall bottle of olive oil or a jar of homemade jam can draw the eye upwards, adding a sense of depth to your photo. They can also be used to hold drinks or layered desserts, adding a sense of indulgence to your photos.

Remember, the key to successful food photography is to choose props that complement your food, rather than distract from it. The food is the star of the show, and your props should enhance it, not overshadow it. Happy shooting!