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Top 3 Most Useful Macro photography Tips

Published by WPC Official Account on Jun'30,2022

0 | 124


Top 3 Most Useful Macro photography Tips

WPC Official Account
0 | 124 | Aug 13, 2022

Macro photography deals with photographing small objects, and showing them in the photo as something larger than life. Insects, leaves, grasses, and flowers are the most common objects of macro photography, but you can always keep experimenting with the subject. If you own a DSLR and a macro lens, you can take macro images at ease. However, you can very well do macro photography with the help of an iPhone too.  Read this article till the end to know about the 3 key factors of Macro Photography - camera settings, lighting, and composition. 

 

Top 3 Most Useful Macro photography Tips

 

Camera Settings

 

 

In Macro Photography, you should not totally depend on the automatic exposure settings of your camera, as it often falters. So, you need to be really careful about the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO - the three settings to gain control over the exposure. In an ideal macro photographs, photographers always keep a shallow depth of field, with the aperture ranging between f/5.6 and f/11. If you use such a smaller aperture, every detail of the subject will be in focus and will appear sharp. It will also create a blurred background. If the lighting is prominent, use a high shutter speed. It will prevent blurriness, and produce a sharp, crisp image. Try to keep your shutter speed at a minimum of 1/100 per second. If you are capturing moving objects, you should keep the aperture low, and the shutter speed high. For this, always mount your camera on a tripod. Try to shoot at a low ISO, because the higher the ISO, the more grain and noise in your photo. But if the light is scarce, you will need to keep the ISO high, use a faster shutter speed, and allow the maximum light possible. Nowadays, most DSLRs offer an ISO up to 1400 without compromising the quality of the photos.

Lighting 

 

 

The best macro photographs are shot keeping the source of light at a 45-degree angle in front of your subject. If you shoot in daylight, morning is the best time for it. Avoid shooting at noon. The sun is over your head at that time, and the sunlight falls directly on the subject, creating unwanted shadows. If you have no other option than to shoot in the harsh sunlight, use a diffuser to soften the light. You can also use the sunlight coming through the window for indoor macro photography. But make sure it doesn't have any pattern that can cast shadows on your subjects, and ruin the photos. 

Composition 

 

 

Like any other type of photography, composition plays a huge role in macro photography. There are a lot of composition techniques that a macro photographer can apply, the most common being the lead room composition. It involves leaving a lot of empty or 'negative' space in the area faced by the subject. Using the lead room technique in macro photography helps the viewers concentrate on the subject fully. 

And there is an additional tip for you- always switch from auto to manual focus while clicking macro photos. It is because the autofocus does not function accurately at a shallow depth of field. When you choose a manual focus, you can set the right focus for each of the photos. 

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.


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Macro photography deals with photographing small objects, and showing them in the photo as something larger than life. Insects, leaves, grasses, and flowers are the most common objects of macro photography, but you can always keep experimenting with the subject. If you own a DSLR and a macro lens, you can take macro images at ease. However, you can very well do macro photography with the help of an iPhone too.  Read this article till the end to know about the 3 key factors of Macro Photography - camera settings, lighting, and composition. 

 

Top 3 Most Useful Macro photography Tips

 

Camera Settings

 

 

In Macro Photography, you should not totally depend on the automatic exposure settings of your camera, as it often falters. So, you need to be really careful about the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO - the three settings to gain control over the exposure. In an ideal macro photographs, photographers always keep a shallow depth of field, with the aperture ranging between f/5.6 and f/11. If you use such a smaller aperture, every detail of the subject will be in focus and will appear sharp. It will also create a blurred background. If the lighting is prominent, use a high shutter speed. It will prevent blurriness, and produce a sharp, crisp image. Try to keep your shutter speed at a minimum of 1/100 per second. If you are capturing moving objects, you should keep the aperture low, and the shutter speed high. For this, always mount your camera on a tripod. Try to shoot at a low ISO, because the higher the ISO, the more grain and noise in your photo. But if the light is scarce, you will need to keep the ISO high, use a faster shutter speed, and allow the maximum light possible. Nowadays, most DSLRs offer an ISO up to 1400 without compromising the quality of the photos.

Lighting 

 

 

The best macro photographs are shot keeping the source of light at a 45-degree angle in front of your subject. If you shoot in daylight, morning is the best time for it. Avoid shooting at noon. The sun is over your head at that time, and the sunlight falls directly on the subject, creating unwanted shadows. If you have no other option than to shoot in the harsh sunlight, use a diffuser to soften the light. You can also use the sunlight coming through the window for indoor macro photography. But make sure it doesn't have any pattern that can cast shadows on your subjects, and ruin the photos. 

Composition 

 

 

Like any other type of photography, composition plays a huge role in macro photography. There are a lot of composition techniques that a macro photographer can apply, the most common being the lead room composition. It involves leaving a lot of empty or 'negative' space in the area faced by the subject. Using the lead room technique in macro photography helps the viewers concentrate on the subject fully. 

And there is an additional tip for you- always switch from auto to manual focus while clicking macro photos. It is because the autofocus does not function accurately at a shallow depth of field. When you choose a manual focus, you can set the right focus for each of the photos. 

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.