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What Is the Difference Between Close-Up, Macro, And Micro Photography?

Published by WPC Official Account on Jun'30,2022

0 | 122


What Is the Difference Between Close-Up, Macro, And Micro Photography?

WPC Official Account
0 | 122 | Aug 12, 2022

Micro, Macro, and Close-Up Photography are 3 renowned fields in photography. Though these 3 have distinct characteristics, most people use them synonymously. Even photographers sometimes get confused over the matter. This article intends to simplify the concepts of Micro, Macro, and Close-Up Photography, while throwing out the differences between them. 

What Is the Difference Between Close-Up, Macro, And Micro Photography? 

 

What Is Close-up Photography?

 

 

As the name suggests, Close-up photography means capturing the objects from close-up and showing them with as much detail as possible. The subject fills the frame totally. All the details of the object are shown in a way that we normally do not notice. Close-up photography may include anything from a pencil to the moon. As long as the subject covers the entire frame of view, it qualifies as a close-up photograph. It does not depend on the distance between the photographer and the subject. Any regular lens can be used for Close-up Photography. By getting closer to the subject or just zooming in, a photographer can click Close-up Photos. But keep in mind that if you get too close to your subject, the image will be blurred. 

What Is Macro Photography?

 

 

Macro photography is the art of clicking a small object and showing it in a way that it looks large. Usually, the size of the subject clicked by the photographer reaches the camera’s chip at a much smaller size. The closer the photographer gets to the subject, the bigger the size of the image on the sensor gets. In the case of macro photography, when a photographer clicks a subject of 1cm size, it will reach the camera’s chip at 1cm too. It may even be more than that. The subject does not always cover the frame fully. In fact, many macro photographers use 'Lead Room Composition' and purposefully leave some empty space where the subject looks at. It gives a break to the viewers' eyes and draws their gaze directly to the subject. Common macro photography subjects are insects, flowers, and plants. Though in macro photography, the image size at the sensor should be equal to or even greater than the original size, some macro lenses cannot produce that, having a close-up setting only. So, you need to be careful about the lens you choose if you want to do macro photography.

What Is Micro Photography?

 

 

Microphotography refers to clicking pictures with a high magnification that ranges between 10:1 and 20:1. It means the size of the subject is magnified to 10 or 20 times. This magnification range is much more than that of macro photography. No specific microlens is there for micro photography. The equipment required for it is a microscope. With the right microscope, you can magnify your subject 100 times or even more. Inspection microscopes have ring lights that help to illuminate the object. Some microscopes come with a built-in USB camera. Though these are easy to use, the resolution is pretty low. You may buy a microscope with a C-mount port so that you can attach it with an adaptor. 

 

Gaining knowledge about the differences between Micro, Macro, and Close-Up Photography will help you to choose the right equipment and technique for each of these, and produce much better photos than before. 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC. 


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Micro, Macro, and Close-Up Photography are 3 renowned fields in photography. Though these 3 have distinct characteristics, most people use them synonymously. Even photographers sometimes get confused over the matter. This article intends to simplify the concepts of Micro, Macro, and Close-Up Photography, while throwing out the differences between them. 

What Is the Difference Between Close-Up, Macro, And Micro Photography? 

 

What Is Close-up Photography?

 

 

As the name suggests, Close-up photography means capturing the objects from close-up and showing them with as much detail as possible. The subject fills the frame totally. All the details of the object are shown in a way that we normally do not notice. Close-up photography may include anything from a pencil to the moon. As long as the subject covers the entire frame of view, it qualifies as a close-up photograph. It does not depend on the distance between the photographer and the subject. Any regular lens can be used for Close-up Photography. By getting closer to the subject or just zooming in, a photographer can click Close-up Photos. But keep in mind that if you get too close to your subject, the image will be blurred. 

What Is Macro Photography?

 

 

Macro photography is the art of clicking a small object and showing it in a way that it looks large. Usually, the size of the subject clicked by the photographer reaches the camera’s chip at a much smaller size. The closer the photographer gets to the subject, the bigger the size of the image on the sensor gets. In the case of macro photography, when a photographer clicks a subject of 1cm size, it will reach the camera’s chip at 1cm too. It may even be more than that. The subject does not always cover the frame fully. In fact, many macro photographers use 'Lead Room Composition' and purposefully leave some empty space where the subject looks at. It gives a break to the viewers' eyes and draws their gaze directly to the subject. Common macro photography subjects are insects, flowers, and plants. Though in macro photography, the image size at the sensor should be equal to or even greater than the original size, some macro lenses cannot produce that, having a close-up setting only. So, you need to be careful about the lens you choose if you want to do macro photography.

What Is Micro Photography?

 

 

Microphotography refers to clicking pictures with a high magnification that ranges between 10:1 and 20:1. It means the size of the subject is magnified to 10 or 20 times. This magnification range is much more than that of macro photography. No specific microlens is there for micro photography. The equipment required for it is a microscope. With the right microscope, you can magnify your subject 100 times or even more. Inspection microscopes have ring lights that help to illuminate the object. Some microscopes come with a built-in USB camera. Though these are easy to use, the resolution is pretty low. You may buy a microscope with a C-mount port so that you can attach it with an adaptor. 

 

Gaining knowledge about the differences between Micro, Macro, and Close-Up Photography will help you to choose the right equipment and technique for each of these, and produce much better photos than before. 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.