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Why Should You Shoot In RAW?

Published by WPC Official Account on Nov'06,2022

0 | 62


Why Should You Shoot In RAW?

WPC Official Account
0 | 62 | Dec 04, 2022

As a newbie photographer,  you must have heard expert photographers saying a million times,  "Shoot in RAW". But nobody has probably told you why you need to do that, right? RAW is the unprocessed format that you need to process in software like Lightroom before sharing. These files take up much more space than the JPEG format. Though it might sound right for you, despite all these cons, shooting in RAW is more beneficial than that in JPEG format. In this article, you will know the top 4 advantages of shooting in RAW. After reading it, you will never want to shoot in any other format than RAW. 

Why Should You Shoot In RAW? 

You Can Get More Details

 

RAW files are larger than other file formats- almost 5 times a JPEG file. It is simply because it preserves much more information. If you shoot in JPEG format, the details are missed, as the file is compressed. And the opposite thing happens when you shoot in RAW. In the post-processing stage, you get all the possible information and get the opportunity to create your best photo by omitting what is unnecessary and working on the areas that are important. So, do not compromise with the file format for storage. Buy an external hard drive if necessary, but shoot in RAW only. 

You Can Adjust The Brightness To Better 

 

 

RAW file format preserves as much information of brightness- be it highlights or shadows. In a single shot, you will get countless levels of brightness. But if you shoot in JPEG, you will not get all this information as the camera discards some levels in order to compress it. So, shoot in RAW to get the maximum details of brightness while post-processing so that your photo gets multiple layers and doesn't appear monotonous or blunt. It also helps to balance the effects of light coming from different sources. If your photo gets overexposed or underexposed, you will get many more options to rectify those in RAW files. 


You Can Adjust The White Balance Better 

 

 

Like brightness, RAW files store amazingly detailed information about white balance too. You might think that it is not very important for you as you might already see the temperature of the light in a scene (if you have turned on that setting). But, you will not get the correct white balance in this way if there are multiple light sources. So, it is always better to shoot in RAW keeping the white balance in auto mode and work on correcting it during the post-processing stage. You can then change the light temperature as you visualize the scene. On the other hand, if you shoot in JPEG, your photo will have the white balance as per the camera settings only. 

You Will Get More Color Shades

 

 

You will be surprised to know that while JPEG files collect up to 256 shades of color, RAW files save 65,000 shades, which is more than 250 times the former. The more shades you get during post-processing, the better. Also, due to the reduction of the total number of shades in a JPEG file, it shows uneven color gradation or banding, which is difficult to deal with. 


Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.


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As a newbie photographer,  you must have heard expert photographers saying a million times,  "Shoot in RAW". But nobody has probably told you why you need to do that, right? RAW is the unprocessed format that you need to process in software like Lightroom before sharing. These files take up much more space than the JPEG format. Though it might sound right for you, despite all these cons, shooting in RAW is more beneficial than that in JPEG format. In this article, you will know the top 4 advantages of shooting in RAW. After reading it, you will never want to shoot in any other format than RAW. 

Why Should You Shoot In RAW? 

You Can Get More Details

 

RAW files are larger than other file formats- almost 5 times a JPEG file. It is simply because it preserves much more information. If you shoot in JPEG format, the details are missed, as the file is compressed. And the opposite thing happens when you shoot in RAW. In the post-processing stage, you get all the possible information and get the opportunity to create your best photo by omitting what is unnecessary and working on the areas that are important. So, do not compromise with the file format for storage. Buy an external hard drive if necessary, but shoot in RAW only. 

You Can Adjust The Brightness To Better 

 

 

RAW file format preserves as much information of brightness- be it highlights or shadows. In a single shot, you will get countless levels of brightness. But if you shoot in JPEG, you will not get all this information as the camera discards some levels in order to compress it. So, shoot in RAW to get the maximum details of brightness while post-processing so that your photo gets multiple layers and doesn't appear monotonous or blunt. It also helps to balance the effects of light coming from different sources. If your photo gets overexposed or underexposed, you will get many more options to rectify those in RAW files. 


You Can Adjust The White Balance Better 

 

 

Like brightness, RAW files store amazingly detailed information about white balance too. You might think that it is not very important for you as you might already see the temperature of the light in a scene (if you have turned on that setting). But, you will not get the correct white balance in this way if there are multiple light sources. So, it is always better to shoot in RAW keeping the white balance in auto mode and work on correcting it during the post-processing stage. You can then change the light temperature as you visualize the scene. On the other hand, if you shoot in JPEG, your photo will have the white balance as per the camera settings only. 

You Will Get More Color Shades

 

 

You will be surprised to know that while JPEG files collect up to 256 shades of color, RAW files save 65,000 shades, which is more than 250 times the former. The more shades you get during post-processing, the better. Also, due to the reduction of the total number of shades in a JPEG file, it shows uneven color gradation or banding, which is difficult to deal with. 


Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.