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4 Ways To Avoid Overexposed Photos

Published by WPC Official Account on Nov'06,2022

0 | 69


4 Ways To Avoid Overexposed Photos

WPC Official Account
0 | 69 | Dec 04, 2022

Overexposed images are the headache of most beginner photographers. Many times, they have to discard most of the photos that they take during a shoot for this issue. It is really frustrating to reject an otherwise perfect photo for being overexposed. There are several causes for this overexposure. So, it is not possible to rectify the error if you do not know exactly why it occurred. Even skilled and experienced photographers sometimes spoil their photos, failing to get the right exposure. When you know why images are overexposed and how to deal with this issue, you will never have to reject any of the beautiful images from now on, for being overexposed. In this article, you will get to know how to avoid overexposed photos. 

4 Ways To Avoid Overexposed Photos

Be Careful About Metering Mode

 

 

As they say, “prevention is better than cure”. Choosing the wrong metering mode is the major cause of overexposure for most new photographers. So, you need to be aware of that each time you shoot. In your camera, you will find 3 metering modes, which are:- Matrix which evaluates an entire scene to find out the best exposure, Centre-Weighted that evaluates the center of the image and find the best exposure from it, and Spot Metering which locates only one spot in your scene to expose it, leaving the rest of the image. You need to pay attention to how is the metering mode working to avoid clicking overexposed photos in the first place. 

Use Bracketing

 

Experienced photographers use this technique to avoid overexposure in photos. They take 3 photographs with consecutive exposure values. Taking two extra shots of higher and lower exposure values gives the opportunity to use them if the desired does not turn out as good as expected. Do not forget to turn the manual mode on before you proceed. You can also use HDR (high dynamic range) technique to balance the lighting if a single scene has both overexposed and underexposed areas. 

Add a Graduated Filter

 

By following the simple steps mentioned above, you can avoid taking overexposed photos or improve the exposure of the photos. And even if you take one, you can always correct it during post-processing. You will find a Graduated Filter tool that helps in correcting overexposed images. If you are a landscape photographer, you might have already used the Graduated Neutral Density filter to incorporate a darkness gradient in your photo. This tool works more or less in the same way. 

Click Well-exposed Image

 

To take a well-exposed image, firstly take care of the metering. Secondly, be cautious about the exposure triangle - consisting of aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that together contribute to overexposure. If very bright light falls on the subject, fix it by either increasing the aperture, shutter speed or decreasing the ISO. Experts also advise manually underexposing your photos during editing, so that you can later increase the exposure value to get the desired result. When you underexpose your images first, details remain intact, unlike overexposure.

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.

 


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Overexposed images are the headache of most beginner photographers. Many times, they have to discard most of the photos that they take during a shoot for this issue. It is really frustrating to reject an otherwise perfect photo for being overexposed. There are several causes for this overexposure. So, it is not possible to rectify the error if you do not know exactly why it occurred. Even skilled and experienced photographers sometimes spoil their photos, failing to get the right exposure. When you know why images are overexposed and how to deal with this issue, you will never have to reject any of the beautiful images from now on, for being overexposed. In this article, you will get to know how to avoid overexposed photos. 

4 Ways To Avoid Overexposed Photos

Be Careful About Metering Mode

 

 

As they say, “prevention is better than cure”. Choosing the wrong metering mode is the major cause of overexposure for most new photographers. So, you need to be aware of that each time you shoot. In your camera, you will find 3 metering modes, which are:- Matrix which evaluates an entire scene to find out the best exposure, Centre-Weighted that evaluates the center of the image and find the best exposure from it, and Spot Metering which locates only one spot in your scene to expose it, leaving the rest of the image. You need to pay attention to how is the metering mode working to avoid clicking overexposed photos in the first place. 

Use Bracketing

 

Experienced photographers use this technique to avoid overexposure in photos. They take 3 photographs with consecutive exposure values. Taking two extra shots of higher and lower exposure values gives the opportunity to use them if the desired does not turn out as good as expected. Do not forget to turn the manual mode on before you proceed. You can also use HDR (high dynamic range) technique to balance the lighting if a single scene has both overexposed and underexposed areas. 

Add a Graduated Filter

 

By following the simple steps mentioned above, you can avoid taking overexposed photos or improve the exposure of the photos. And even if you take one, you can always correct it during post-processing. You will find a Graduated Filter tool that helps in correcting overexposed images. If you are a landscape photographer, you might have already used the Graduated Neutral Density filter to incorporate a darkness gradient in your photo. This tool works more or less in the same way. 

Click Well-exposed Image

 

To take a well-exposed image, firstly take care of the metering. Secondly, be cautious about the exposure triangle - consisting of aperture, shutter speed, and ISO that together contribute to overexposure. If very bright light falls on the subject, fix it by either increasing the aperture, shutter speed or decreasing the ISO. Experts also advise manually underexposing your photos during editing, so that you can later increase the exposure value to get the desired result. When you underexpose your images first, details remain intact, unlike overexposure.

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.