Bokeh Effect

Published by WPC Official Account on Sep'16,2019

2 | 1369


Bokeh Effect

WPC Official Account
2 | 1369 | Sep 16, 2019

In photography, Bokeh is the effect created by some lenses, and these days using the software in Smartphones, to blur out of focus parts in the images. Usually, fast lenses with a wide aperture of f/2.8, f/2, f/1.8 or lower are ideal for creating a Bokeh effect in an image. 

By Harish Khanna, f/2.8

The bokeh effect can be described by the concept of depth of field (DOF) and Aperture. The Aperture and DOF determine how much to blur the background or in technical terms, make the background out of focus. The more the distance of background from the primary subject more blurry it can become and it all depends on the value of the aperture.

  • Higher the f-number(f/5.3, f/7 and above), greater is the DOF and more of the frame is in focus.
  • Should be used for landscape, nature, architectural etc types of photography
  • A smaller f-number (f/2.8, f/1.8 or smaller) narrows the DOF making only the primary object in focus and leaving background and also the foreground out of focus. 
  • Should be used for portraits, macro, birds etc types of photography

 

By Milad Hameed, f/2.8

By Soumyajit Sarcar, f/1.8

Bokeh effect is really good for macro photography and clicking portraits of people or animals. This way photographers put the focus on the primary subject as all other things become out of focus. 

By Dhruv Ashra, f/1.8

By Ajit Pendse, f/2.8

Though the effect can also be created using wide angle lenses or zoom lenses with higher aperture values. The distance of the primary subject from foreground and background could determine the amount of blur effect. For e.g in the photo below the photographer could achieve the blur effect even at f/5.3 because the subject in the background is at a good distance. 

By Aditi Gupta, f/5.3

Also, to continue on this, please also read about The Exposure Triangle

Happy Clicking !! WorldPhotographersClub.com


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In photography, Bokeh is the effect created by some lenses, and these days using the software in Smartphones, to blur out of focus parts in the images. Usually, fast lenses with a wide aperture of f/2.8, f/2, f/1.8 or lower are ideal for creating a Bokeh effect in an image. 

By Harish Khanna, f/2.8

The bokeh effect can be described by the concept of depth of field (DOF) and Aperture. The Aperture and DOF determine how much to blur the background or in technical terms, make the background out of focus. The more the distance of background from the primary subject more blurry it can become and it all depends on the value of the aperture.

  • Higher the f-number(f/5.3, f/7 and above), greater is the DOF and more of the frame is in focus.
  • Should be used for landscape, nature, architectural etc types of photography
  • A smaller f-number (f/2.8, f/1.8 or smaller) narrows the DOF making only the primary object in focus and leaving background and also the foreground out of focus. 
  • Should be used for portraits, macro, birds etc types of photography

 

By Milad Hameed, f/2.8

By Soumyajit Sarcar, f/1.8

Bokeh effect is really good for macro photography and clicking portraits of people or animals. This way photographers put the focus on the primary subject as all other things become out of focus. 

By Dhruv Ashra, f/1.8

By Ajit Pendse, f/2.8

Though the effect can also be created using wide angle lenses or zoom lenses with higher aperture values. The distance of the primary subject from foreground and background could determine the amount of blur effect. For e.g in the photo below the photographer could achieve the blur effect even at f/5.3 because the subject in the background is at a good distance. 

By Aditi Gupta, f/5.3

Also, to continue on this, please also read about The Exposure Triangle

Happy Clicking !! WorldPhotographersClub.com