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Top 3 Most Common Wildlife Photography Tips

Published by WPC Official Account on Dec'18,2022

0 | 77


Top 3 Most Common Wildlife Photography Tips

WPC Official Account
0 | 77 | Jan 30, 2023

Wildlife photography is one of the most difficult genres of photography. It is particularly true when you are a beginner in this field. Finding the subject is often a matter of luck, even if you find them they flee away before you click the shutter, you need to depend on natural light, and so many obstacles are there. However, if you follow some tips shared by experts, it will not be as tough for you as it seemed before. 

No matter which wildlife creature you are going to click on with your camera, these 3 tips will turn the challenges of wildlife photography into opportunities. 

Top 3 Most Common Wildlife Photography Tips 

Focus On Lighting 

 

 

As you probably know already, the best times of the day to use natural light is one hour before sunset and one hour after sunrise. These two moments of the day are called the golden period by photographers. Shooting in golden light is especially beneficial for wildlife photographers because most of the animals become active in any of the two times. Also, light falls obliquely in the golden period, which helps you to use a more effective composition. During the day, try shooting when the light is soft. Unlike many other outdoor photography genres, the cloudy sky actually helps in wildlife photography by diffusing the natural light evenly. When you shoot in such light conditions, the colors of your photo are enhanced. 

Take Close-Up Pictures

 

 

It is not easy to take a close-up picture of wild animals, and that is why you should aim for it. It will make your photos stand out from the rest of the crowd. Remember, if you do not go close, your photo, however good it is, will look more like a landscape photo than a wildlife one. But you will need to acquire enough expertise for that. As a beginner, you will probably make many mistakes that will scare your subject and make it flee. After practicing for a long, at the cost of many missed opportunities, you will learn to take good close-ups of wild creatures. Also, you do not usually require to go close physically to the animals to take a close-up. you can use 100-400 mm telephoto lenses for that. Again, using this lens perfectly will need thorough practice. 

Shoot From Eye-Level

 

 

It is a great tip that almost all expert wildlife photographers share. You should bend down and shoot from the eye level of the animals. Otherwise, you will not be able to portray the beauty of the animal fully. When you shoot from above, the subject looks smaller than it actually is. You might need to crawl on the ground to come to the eye level of really short animals, but the effort will be worth it. While shooting from eye level, just be careful about the muddy ground when you are bending down. You can use protective pads. If you are using a tripod, widen the legs as much as possible to lower the camera. If it still doesn’t work, place the camera bag on the ground and position your camera on it. 

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC. 

 


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Wildlife photography is one of the most difficult genres of photography. It is particularly true when you are a beginner in this field. Finding the subject is often a matter of luck, even if you find them they flee away before you click the shutter, you need to depend on natural light, and so many obstacles are there. However, if you follow some tips shared by experts, it will not be as tough for you as it seemed before. 

No matter which wildlife creature you are going to click on with your camera, these 3 tips will turn the challenges of wildlife photography into opportunities. 

Top 3 Most Common Wildlife Photography Tips 

Focus On Lighting 

 

 

As you probably know already, the best times of the day to use natural light is one hour before sunset and one hour after sunrise. These two moments of the day are called the golden period by photographers. Shooting in golden light is especially beneficial for wildlife photographers because most of the animals become active in any of the two times. Also, light falls obliquely in the golden period, which helps you to use a more effective composition. During the day, try shooting when the light is soft. Unlike many other outdoor photography genres, the cloudy sky actually helps in wildlife photography by diffusing the natural light evenly. When you shoot in such light conditions, the colors of your photo are enhanced. 

Take Close-Up Pictures

 

 

It is not easy to take a close-up picture of wild animals, and that is why you should aim for it. It will make your photos stand out from the rest of the crowd. Remember, if you do not go close, your photo, however good it is, will look more like a landscape photo than a wildlife one. But you will need to acquire enough expertise for that. As a beginner, you will probably make many mistakes that will scare your subject and make it flee. After practicing for a long, at the cost of many missed opportunities, you will learn to take good close-ups of wild creatures. Also, you do not usually require to go close physically to the animals to take a close-up. you can use 100-400 mm telephoto lenses for that. Again, using this lens perfectly will need thorough practice. 

Shoot From Eye-Level

 

 

It is a great tip that almost all expert wildlife photographers share. You should bend down and shoot from the eye level of the animals. Otherwise, you will not be able to portray the beauty of the animal fully. When you shoot from above, the subject looks smaller than it actually is. You might need to crawl on the ground to come to the eye level of really short animals, but the effort will be worth it. While shooting from eye level, just be careful about the muddy ground when you are bending down. You can use protective pads. If you are using a tripod, widen the legs as much as possible to lower the camera. If it still doesn’t work, place the camera bag on the ground and position your camera on it. 

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.