5 Tips for Photographing Indoors!

Published by WPC Official Blog on Feb'21,2019

0 | 573


5 Tips for Photographing Indoors!

WPC Official Blog
0 | 573 | Feb 21, 2019

1. Use natural light

When photographing an interior, always remember to turn off all other lights. You might be a little perplexed by this rule, after all – light is an important aspect of photography. Does it raise the question that - What if the natural light coming in isn’t that strong? , well isn’t that what your camera shutter speed settings are for. Attach your tripod and the camera to avoid motion blur and super slow down the shutter speed to allow for a long exposure. This will allow your camera to pick up whatever light there is in the room and you won’t have to resort to artificial light or your flash.

Once you begin taking interior photos exclusively with natural light, you’ll see just how much more beautiful it makes the final result. Colors will appear fresh and clean, shadows will come from more natural directions, and the chances of needing to adjust your white balance in post-production are severely diminished.

 

2. Make room

Whenever shooting indoors, always remember that not all the furniture settings are perfect for a natural look. A little rearrangement might give you better results. When working in small spaces, be it small apartments, kitchens, bathrooms etc, you might use a Wide Angle Lens or position yourself in a way to capture the desired frame. You might use doors or hallways to click a picture (sometimes they do the necessary work with all the natural light exposure).

3. Be aware of the background or clutter

There’s nothing worse than taking an amazing photo and then finding a clutter in it just before using it. You might be a Photoshop expert but it’s always recommended to photograph your subject the way that you would want to see it. Always follow this simple rule while shooting because even a little bit of a lamp cord or the edge of the carpet or an artificial plant leaf is enough to ruin a picture. And might require a significant effort to correct it in post processing.

Always keep the final image of your subject in your mind just as you want to see it, it helps in the betterment of your skills. Yes, you’ll make mistakes but try to learn from them instead of shrugging over it and cropping it.

 

 

4. Shoot straight

When it comes to composing interior photos, it is best to shoot straight on. Using the room’s architectural framework as a guide, point your camera so that it aligns perfectly with one of the walls. If your camera has a grid or compositional tools in the viewfinder (even iPhones have this feature built-in), this is a perfect time to use that tool.

Rather than creating a dynamic composition through overly-dramatic camera angles, this technique allows for a much more harmonious end result – it uses your walls as a blank canvas of sorts with dynamism created through the composition of objects (like brush strokes) within the photograph. This technique also allows you to have more options if and when you decide to crop your photo (which by-the-way, still not a good idea).

5. Shoot RAW

RAW files are basically untouched photographic data. If you were to draw a parallel between digital photography and film photography, a RAW file would be next to an unprocessed negative, it is essentially a record of light hitting the camera’s sensor and has not yet been turned into pixels.

Of the many reasons to shoot in RAW mode is that it allows you to have the most control over your final image. RAW files preserve much more photographic information, allowing you to retrieve seemingly blown out or underexposed areas, adjust white balance more accurately, and determine the final size of your photo.

Make your Free account on World Photographers Club Now!

Happy Shooting!

WPC Team


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1. Use natural light

When photographing an interior, always remember to turn off all other lights. You might be a little perplexed by this rule, after all – light is an important aspect of photography. Does it raise the question that - What if the natural light coming in isn’t that strong? , well isn’t that what your camera shutter speed settings are for. Attach your tripod and the camera to avoid motion blur and super slow down the shutter speed to allow for a long exposure. This will allow your camera to pick up whatever light there is in the room and you won’t have to resort to artificial light or your flash.

Once you begin taking interior photos exclusively with natural light, you’ll see just how much more beautiful it makes the final result. Colors will appear fresh and clean, shadows will come from more natural directions, and the chances of needing to adjust your white balance in post-production are severely diminished.

 

2. Make room

Whenever shooting indoors, always remember that not all the furniture settings are perfect for a natural look. A little rearrangement might give you better results. When working in small spaces, be it small apartments, kitchens, bathrooms etc, you might use a Wide Angle Lens or position yourself in a way to capture the desired frame. You might use doors or hallways to click a picture (sometimes they do the necessary work with all the natural light exposure).

3. Be aware of the background or clutter

There’s nothing worse than taking an amazing photo and then finding a clutter in it just before using it. You might be a Photoshop expert but it’s always recommended to photograph your subject the way that you would want to see it. Always follow this simple rule while shooting because even a little bit of a lamp cord or the edge of the carpet or an artificial plant leaf is enough to ruin a picture. And might require a significant effort to correct it in post processing.

Always keep the final image of your subject in your mind just as you want to see it, it helps in the betterment of your skills. Yes, you’ll make mistakes but try to learn from them instead of shrugging over it and cropping it.

 

 

4. Shoot straight

When it comes to composing interior photos, it is best to shoot straight on. Using the room’s architectural framework as a guide, point your camera so that it aligns perfectly with one of the walls. If your camera has a grid or compositional tools in the viewfinder (even iPhones have this feature built-in), this is a perfect time to use that tool.

Rather than creating a dynamic composition through overly-dramatic camera angles, this technique allows for a much more harmonious end result – it uses your walls as a blank canvas of sorts with dynamism created through the composition of objects (like brush strokes) within the photograph. This technique also allows you to have more options if and when you decide to crop your photo (which by-the-way, still not a good idea).

5. Shoot RAW

RAW files are basically untouched photographic data. If you were to draw a parallel between digital photography and film photography, a RAW file would be next to an unprocessed negative, it is essentially a record of light hitting the camera’s sensor and has not yet been turned into pixels.

Of the many reasons to shoot in RAW mode is that it allows you to have the most control over your final image. RAW files preserve much more photographic information, allowing you to retrieve seemingly blown out or underexposed areas, adjust white balance more accurately, and determine the final size of your photo.

Make your Free account on World Photographers Club Now!

Happy Shooting!

WPC Team