Top 10 Photographers We Miss

Published by WPC Official on May'27,2019

0 | 604


Top 10 Photographers We Miss

WPC Official
0 | 604 | May 27, 2019

Ever thought who were the best photographers of the world? Here You Go!

1. Richard Avedon (May 15, 1923 – October 1, 2004)

An American fashion and portrait photographer Richard Avedon also practiced Reportage Photography. His fashion and portrait photography helped to define America’s image of style, beauty, and culture for the last half-century.

He has been associated with the top fashion magazines like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Life, The New Yorker, etc. as a chief photographer. He did not go through the conventional way of photographing fashion with emotionless expressions of models, however, Avedon visualized models with deep emotions, and, many times, in action in outdoor settings, creating a revolution. However, towards the end of the 1950’s he became dissatisfied with daylight photography and open air locations, therefore, turned to studio photography, using strobe lighting.

Avedon also practiced advertisement photography on the sidelines for The New Yorker and album covers for the big time bands like The Beatles, The Factory, etc…

 Credits: wikipedia.org

2. William Eugene Smith (December 30, 1918 – October 15, 1978)

He was an American photojournalist, renowned for his devotion to the projects and his resolute professional and ethical standards. Smith developed the photo-essay into a sophisticated visual form. His most famous studies include brutally vivid visuals of the 2nd World War, the clinic of Dr. Schweitzer in French Equatorial Africa, the city of Pittsburg, the dedication of an American country doctor and a nurse midwife, and the pollution which damaged the health of the residents of Minamata in Japan.

 Credits: wikipedia.org

 

 

3. Helmut Newton (October 31, 1920 – January 23, 2004)

Helmut was a German-Australian photographer. He was a “prolific and widely imitated fashion photographer who’s provocative, erotically charged black-and-white photos were a mainstay of Vogue and other such publications.

He has received a number of awards. In 1989 he was named ‘Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres’ by the French Minister of Culture, and in 1992 he was awarded the ‘Chevalier des Arts Lettres et Science’ by Monaco. Life magazine gave him ‘Life Legend Award for Lifetime Achievement in Magazine Photography’ in 1999.

Credits: wikipedia.org

 

 

4. Irving Penn (June 16, 1917 – October 7, 2009)

Irving was an American photographer born in a Russian-Jewish family, known for his fashion photography, portraits and still lives. Penn’s career included work at Vogue magazine and independent advertising work for clients including Issey Miyake and Clinique. His work has been exhibited internationally and continues to inform the art of photography.

Penn was among the first photographers to pose subjects against a simple grey or white backdrop and he effectively used this simplicity. Expanding his severe studio surroundings, Penn constructed a set of upright angled backdrops, to form a stark, acute corner. Subjects photographed with this technique included Martha Graham, Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, W. H. Auden and Igor Stravinsky

Credits: irvingpenn.org

 

 

5. Henri Cartier – Bresson (August 22, 1908 – August 3, 2004)

Henri was a French humanist photographer, considered master of Candid Photography and an early user of 35mm film. He pioneered the genre of Street Photography and conceived photography as capturing a decisive moment. His work has influenced many photographers.

Cartier– Bresson’s first photojournalist photos to be published came in 1937 when he covered the coronation ceremony of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth for the French weekly Regards. He focused on the new monarch’s adoring subjects lining the London streets and took no pictures of the king. His photos read “Cartier”, as he was hesitant to use his full family name.

 

 Credits: wikipedia.org

 

6. Ansel Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984)

An American Photographer and an environmentalist, Ansel Adams was a very famous photographer. His fame rose after his Black & White Landscape photographs of Yosemite National Park got attention. His photographs have been widely reproduced in calendars, posters, book, etc.

He used large-format cameras to ensure sharpness and high resolution. Ansel received many awards during his career, including honorary artium doctor degree from Harvard University and an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Yale University.

 

Credits: Wikipedia.org

7. Robert Capa (October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954)

Robert Capa was a Hungarian War Photographer and Photojournalist. He was considered as the greatest combat and adventure photographer. He risked his life numerous times to capture the best photographs. He was the first photographer to capture World War II images.

He was awarded the Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower. He covered many wars including Chinese resistance to Invasion, World War II, American Invasion of Sicily, etc.

 

Credits: Wikipedia.org

8. Dorothea Lange (May 26, 1895 – October 11, 1965)

Dorothea Lange was an American documentary photographer and photojournalist. She was best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration. Dorothea’s work humanized the consequences of the Great Depression. It was her work, which influenced the development of Documentary Photography.

She was awarded, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1941 for her photography work. Although, she gave up the award after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

 

Credits: wikipedia.org

9. Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971)

Diane Arbus was an American Photographer and writer. She was famous for her photographs of people who were marginalized people like dwarfs, giants, transgender people, nudists, circus performers, etc. Arbus was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for a project on "American rites, manners, and customs".

 

Credits: wikipedia.org

 

10. Yousuf Karsh (December 23, 1908 – July 13, 2002)

Yousuf Karsh was an American Canadian Photographer. He is best known for portrait photography. He has been called one of the great portrait photographers of the 20th century by Time magazine. Portraits of Winston Churchill, Albert Einstein, Elizabeth II, John F. Kennedy were some of his recognized works. He was bestowed with the prestigious Order of Canada.

Credits: wikipedia.org

Create your Free account now at www.worldphotographersclub.com

WPC Team

 


Sign up with a free account to write and earn from your articles.


More Articles For You

photo

Learn Photo Basics : 5 Important Filters in Digital Photography

by Nishkam Bhatia

photo

Best Apps for Double Exposures for Mobile Phones

by WPC Official

photo

Colour RED

by WPC Official

photo

Colour Green

by WPC Official

photo

Things You Need To Know To Be A Fashion Photographer

by WPC Official

photo

Event Photography

by WPC Official

Ever thought who were the best photographers of the world? Here You Go!

1. Richard Avedon (May 15, 1923 – October 1, 2004)

An American fashion and portrait photographer Richard Avedon also practiced Reportage Photography. His fashion and portrait photography helped to define America’s image of style, beauty, and culture for the last half-century.

He has been associated with the top fashion magazines like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Life, The New Yorker, etc. as a chief photographer. He did not go through the conventional way of photographing fashion with emotionless expressions of models, however, Avedon visualized models with deep emotions, and, many times, in action in outdoor settings, creating a revolution. However, towards the end of the 1950’s he became dissatisfied with daylight photography and open air locations, therefore, turned to studio photography, using strobe lighting.

Avedon also practiced advertisement photography on the sidelines for The New Yorker and album covers for the big time bands like The Beatles, The Factory, etc…

 Credits: wikipedia.org

2. William Eugene Smith (December 30, 1918 – October 15, 1978)

He was an American photojournalist, renowned for his devotion to the projects and his resolute professional and ethical standards. Smith developed the photo-essay into a sophisticated visual form. His most famous studies include brutally vivid visuals of the 2nd World War, the clinic of Dr. Schweitzer in French Equatorial Africa, the city of Pittsburg, the dedication of an American country doctor and a nurse midwife, and the pollution which damaged the health of the residents of Minamata in Japan.

 Credits: wikipedia.org

 

 

3. Helmut Newton (October 31, 1920 – January 23, 2004)

Helmut was a German-Australian photographer. He was a “prolific and widely imitated fashion photographer who’s provocative, erotically charged black-and-white photos were a mainstay of Vogue and other such publications.

He has received a number of awards. In 1989 he was named ‘Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres’ by the French Minister of Culture, and in 1992 he was awarded the ‘Chevalier des Arts Lettres et Science’ by Monaco. Life magazine gave him ‘Life Legend Award for Lifetime Achievement in Magazine Photography’ in 1999.

Credits: wikipedia.org

 

 

4. Irving Penn (June 16, 1917 – October 7, 2009)

Irving was an American photographer born in a Russian-Jewish family, known for his fashion photography, portraits and still lives. Penn’s career included work at Vogue magazine and independent advertising work for clients including Issey Miyake and Clinique. His work has been exhibited internationally and continues to inform the art of photography.

Penn was among the first photographers to pose subjects against a simple grey or white backdrop and he effectively used this simplicity. Expanding his severe studio surroundings, Penn constructed a set of upright angled backdrops, to form a stark, acute corner. Subjects photographed with this technique included Martha Graham, Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, W. H. Auden and Igor Stravinsky

Credits: irvingpenn.org

 

 

5. Henri Cartier – Bresson (August 22, 1908 – August 3, 2004)

Henri was a French humanist photographer, considered master of Candid Photography and an early user of 35mm film. He pioneered the genre of Street Photography and conceived photography as capturing a decisive moment. His work has influenced many photographers.

Cartier– Bresson’s first photojournalist photos to be published came in 1937 when he covered the coronation ceremony of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth for the French weekly Regards. He focused on the new monarch’s adoring subjects lining the London streets and took no pictures of the king. His photos read “Cartier”, as he was hesitant to use his full family name.

 

 Credits: wikipedia.org

 

6. Ansel Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984)

An American Photographer and an environmentalist, Ansel Adams was a very famous photographer. His fame rose after his Black & White Landscape photographs of Yosemite National Park got attention. His photographs have been widely reproduced in calendars, posters, book, etc.

He used large-format cameras to ensure sharpness and high resolution. Ansel received many awards during his career, including honorary artium doctor degree from Harvard University and an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Yale University.

 

Credits: Wikipedia.org

7. Robert Capa (October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954)

Robert Capa was a Hungarian War Photographer and Photojournalist. He was considered as the greatest combat and adventure photographer. He risked his life numerous times to capture the best photographs. He was the first photographer to capture World War II images.

He was awarded the Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower. He covered many wars including Chinese resistance to Invasion, World War II, American Invasion of Sicily, etc.

 

Credits: Wikipedia.org

8. Dorothea Lange (May 26, 1895 – October 11, 1965)

Dorothea Lange was an American documentary photographer and photojournalist. She was best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration. Dorothea’s work humanized the consequences of the Great Depression. It was her work, which influenced the development of Documentary Photography.

She was awarded, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1941 for her photography work. Although, she gave up the award after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

 

Credits: wikipedia.org

9. Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971)

Diane Arbus was an American Photographer and writer. She was famous for her photographs of people who were marginalized people like dwarfs, giants, transgender people, nudists, circus performers, etc. Arbus was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for a project on "American rites, manners, and customs".

 

Credits: wikipedia.org

 

10. Yousuf Karsh (December 23, 1908 – July 13, 2002)

Yousuf Karsh was an American Canadian Photographer. He is best known for portrait photography. He has been called one of the great portrait photographers of the 20th century by Time magazine. Portraits of Winston Churchill, Albert Einstein, Elizabeth II, John F. Kennedy were some of his recognized works. He was bestowed with the prestigious Order of Canada.

Credits: wikipedia.org

Create your Free account now at www.worldphotographersclub.com

WPC Team