Want to Know How The Lego Movie was Shot?

Published by WPC Official on May'26,2019

0 | 540


Want to Know How The Lego Movie was Shot?

WPC Official
0 | 540 | May 26, 2019

Motion (control) photography is a technique used in still and motion photography that enables precise control of, camera movements. It is used to facilitate special effects photography.

Tips for Motion Photography

1.     Blurring Motion shots – Let’s assume you’re trying to capture a speeding train against a bunch of garters in the background. You can blur the train while leaving the garters in focus. Doing so would instantly communicate to the viewer that the train is moving quickly. To accomplish this, you would use a slow shutter speed. (It’s also important to use a tripod. That way, your camera remains steady.) You’ll often see this technique used in nighttime photographs with car headlights cutting through the image.

Credits: IoanRaduMester

2.     Panning Motion shots –Panning effectively can be difficult. You can practice and perfect your technique by photographing athletes who move quickly (for example, football players). Try to capture their facial expressions while blurring everything in the background. It will take some time to get it right, but once you do, the technique can be a valuable addition to your repertoire.Panning requires that you move your camera with your subject. Specifically, you’ll be matching your subject’s speed of movement and the direction in which it is traveling.

Credits: Melissa Newkirk

3.     Continuous Shooting Motion shots – To capture motion use the continuous shooting feature on your camera. This will create sequential shots. The series of images created can then be joined together in post production. You’re going to have to use your instinct and experience every time. Look at the speed your subject is moving. Estimate how far away you are from it and how much space you want to pack into your shot. And make a judgment call based on that.The faster your shutter speed, the more sharply your subject will be in focus.

4.     Excess Light – When you slow your shutter speed to blur elements in your image, there’s a chance that too much light will enter and impact your photograph. It’s a common problem, but there are a couple of ways to resolve it. First, check the aperture on your camera. The larger it is (lower the f-number), the more likely excess light will enter. Try adjusting the settings to reduce its size (increase the f-number). Also, check the ISO value. When it is set high, the image sensor in your camera may be overly-sensitive to light. This can create unwanted noise in your image.

Famous Motion Photographers

1.    Eadweard Muybridge (1830 – 1904)

Credits: www.pinterest.com

2.    Etienne – Jules Murey (1830 – 1904)

Credits:www.commoms.wikimedia.org

3.    Harold Eugene Edgerton (1903 – 1990)

Credits: www.photography-now.com

For more information on Photos & Photography, visit www.worldphotographersclub.com

Happy Shooting!

 


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Motion (control) photography is a technique used in still and motion photography that enables precise control of, camera movements. It is used to facilitate special effects photography.

Tips for Motion Photography

1.     Blurring Motion shots – Let’s assume you’re trying to capture a speeding train against a bunch of garters in the background. You can blur the train while leaving the garters in focus. Doing so would instantly communicate to the viewer that the train is moving quickly. To accomplish this, you would use a slow shutter speed. (It’s also important to use a tripod. That way, your camera remains steady.) You’ll often see this technique used in nighttime photographs with car headlights cutting through the image.

Credits: IoanRaduMester

2.     Panning Motion shots –Panning effectively can be difficult. You can practice and perfect your technique by photographing athletes who move quickly (for example, football players). Try to capture their facial expressions while blurring everything in the background. It will take some time to get it right, but once you do, the technique can be a valuable addition to your repertoire.Panning requires that you move your camera with your subject. Specifically, you’ll be matching your subject’s speed of movement and the direction in which it is traveling.

Credits: Melissa Newkirk

3.     Continuous Shooting Motion shots – To capture motion use the continuous shooting feature on your camera. This will create sequential shots. The series of images created can then be joined together in post production. You’re going to have to use your instinct and experience every time. Look at the speed your subject is moving. Estimate how far away you are from it and how much space you want to pack into your shot. And make a judgment call based on that.The faster your shutter speed, the more sharply your subject will be in focus.

4.     Excess Light – When you slow your shutter speed to blur elements in your image, there’s a chance that too much light will enter and impact your photograph. It’s a common problem, but there are a couple of ways to resolve it. First, check the aperture on your camera. The larger it is (lower the f-number), the more likely excess light will enter. Try adjusting the settings to reduce its size (increase the f-number). Also, check the ISO value. When it is set high, the image sensor in your camera may be overly-sensitive to light. This can create unwanted noise in your image.

Famous Motion Photographers

1.    Eadweard Muybridge (1830 – 1904)

Credits: www.pinterest.com

2.    Etienne – Jules Murey (1830 – 1904)

Credits:www.commoms.wikimedia.org

3.    Harold Eugene Edgerton (1903 – 1990)

Credits: www.photography-now.com

For more information on Photos & Photography, visit www.worldphotographersclub.com

Happy Shooting!