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Top 4 Ways To Add Mood To Your Photos

Published by WPC Official Account on May'31,2022

0 | 193


Top 4 Ways To Add Mood To Your Photos

WPC Official Account
0 | 193 | Oct 01, 2022

Adding moods to photos means telling the audience how you felt seeing a particular scene through it. The art of transferring your emotions to the photos you click is challenging. It requires photography knowledge, skills, creativity, and flexibility with the camera. If you know certain techniques, things will get easier for you. This article will help you to convey your mood to the audience through your photos.

Top 4 Ways To Add Mood To Your Photos

Adjust The Color Temperature

 

 

 

Color temperature plays a huge role in adding moods to the photos. For example, both warm and cool temperatures add moods to the photos- but they represent two different moods. Try to rectify it while post-processing the photographs. It will save you from the hassle of setting the color temperature while shooting. You can adjust the color temperature by explicating the image thoroughly during editing which is not possible during the rush of the shoot. Do not forget to shoot in RAW. No other format would give you as many editing options as it.


Add Textures

 

 

 

Multiple textures in a photo enhance its mood. But keep in mind that you just cannot add textures to all the photos you click. It will make your work look monotonous. Also, you may add texture to only part of the photo. Many photographers like to add texture to the background. To add textures, first, create a moody picture, and then add the texture as a layer over your photo using post-processing apps like Photoshop, that support layering. After that, adjust the layer blending mode so that the textures don't look artificial. Multiple textures usually suit portraits, still life, and food photography.

Use Long Exposure

 

 

According to experts, exposures of more than 3 seconds help to add mood to photos. This tip is applicable for capturing moving subjects in landscape photography- like the sea waves or leaves falling off the tree. It is because the moving subject makes a good contrast with the rest of the elements that are still. If your photo includes the sky, then shoot in daylight. Otherwise, the sky may appear black. Always use a tripod and a cable release when you plan to shoot with long exposures. Using the mirror lock-up along with these is even better.

Use A Wide Aperture

 

 

A wide aperture helps to create a shallow depth of field in your photo i.e to focus on only a tiny, sharp area of the subject and pitches the rest of the subject as well as the background out of focus. This 'bokeh' effect makes the photo appear moody in the eyes of the audience. For example, if you are in a garden and focus on a single flower, keeping the entire scenery of the garden out of focus, will communicate different stories to different audiences that you could not possibly convey otherwise. When you are creating a shallow depth of field make sure the background of the subject is dark. A darkened blurry background adds more versatile moods to the picture than a brighter one. If you are using telephoto lenses, then you should set the aperture high.

And there is an additional tip for you to add mood to your photo- do not rush to click when you see a beautiful scene. Pause to think about what emotions you feel seeing it. Only when you identify the feelings correctly, you can portray them in the pictures.


Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.


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Adding moods to photos means telling the audience how you felt seeing a particular scene through it. The art of transferring your emotions to the photos you click is challenging. It requires photography knowledge, skills, creativity, and flexibility with the camera. If you know certain techniques, things will get easier for you. This article will help you to convey your mood to the audience through your photos.

Top 4 Ways To Add Mood To Your Photos

Adjust The Color Temperature

 

 

 

Color temperature plays a huge role in adding moods to the photos. For example, both warm and cool temperatures add moods to the photos- but they represent two different moods. Try to rectify it while post-processing the photographs. It will save you from the hassle of setting the color temperature while shooting. You can adjust the color temperature by explicating the image thoroughly during editing which is not possible during the rush of the shoot. Do not forget to shoot in RAW. No other format would give you as many editing options as it.


Add Textures

 

 

 

Multiple textures in a photo enhance its mood. But keep in mind that you just cannot add textures to all the photos you click. It will make your work look monotonous. Also, you may add texture to only part of the photo. Many photographers like to add texture to the background. To add textures, first, create a moody picture, and then add the texture as a layer over your photo using post-processing apps like Photoshop, that support layering. After that, adjust the layer blending mode so that the textures don't look artificial. Multiple textures usually suit portraits, still life, and food photography.

Use Long Exposure

 

 

According to experts, exposures of more than 3 seconds help to add mood to photos. This tip is applicable for capturing moving subjects in landscape photography- like the sea waves or leaves falling off the tree. It is because the moving subject makes a good contrast with the rest of the elements that are still. If your photo includes the sky, then shoot in daylight. Otherwise, the sky may appear black. Always use a tripod and a cable release when you plan to shoot with long exposures. Using the mirror lock-up along with these is even better.

Use A Wide Aperture

 

 

A wide aperture helps to create a shallow depth of field in your photo i.e to focus on only a tiny, sharp area of the subject and pitches the rest of the subject as well as the background out of focus. This 'bokeh' effect makes the photo appear moody in the eyes of the audience. For example, if you are in a garden and focus on a single flower, keeping the entire scenery of the garden out of focus, will communicate different stories to different audiences that you could not possibly convey otherwise. When you are creating a shallow depth of field make sure the background of the subject is dark. A darkened blurry background adds more versatile moods to the picture than a brighter one. If you are using telephoto lenses, then you should set the aperture high.

And there is an additional tip for you to add mood to your photo- do not rush to click when you see a beautiful scene. Pause to think about what emotions you feel seeing it. Only when you identify the feelings correctly, you can portray them in the pictures.


Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.