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What Should Be The Camera Mode In Landscape Photography?

Published by WPC Official Account on Dec'18,2022

0 | 80


What Should Be The Camera Mode In Landscape Photography?

WPC Official Account
0 | 80 | Jan 30, 2023

If you aspire to click wonderful landscape photos, you need to work on your knowledge of camera settings along with brushing up your photography skills. In camera settings, you may have gathered enough knowledge about how focus, aperture, ISO, etc. work, but if you are unaware of the various camera modes, you will not be able to use your photography skill to the fullest. In this article, you will know about the most used camera modes, how they operate, and when should you set which camera mode. When you know the about the camera modes, and use the right one in the right situation, no one can beat your excellence in photography. 

What Should Be The Camera Mode In Landscape Photography?

Automatic Mode 



You may have heard this advice from experts, "avoid shooting in automatic mode". But when you are a beginner, this automatic mode is the one that lets you shoot comfortably as you do not have to worry about controlling any settings with it. You can work fully on the composition. You are most likely to find this mode as Program or "P" in your camera. When you enable it, your camera automatically selects the aperture and shutter speed. If you feel overwhelmed as a beginner, and learn things slowly and steadily, start with automatic mode. Just position your camera towards your subject and shoot. 

 Aperture Priority Mode 

 

 

In the aperture priority mode, you can have full control over the aperture while leaving the rest. By controlling the aperture (f-stop), you can control how much light you will let enter the sensor. Thereby, you control the depth of field of your image. If you select a narrow aperture, the depth of field will be large that is, most of the foreground and background will be in focus. If you select a wide aperture, the depth of field will be shallow, creating a blurred effect called bokeh. In landscape photography, a large depth of field is majorly created. When you set the aperture priority mode, you can play with the depth of field easily while other factors are taken care of by the camera. One issue with this mode is that you cannot control the shutter speed with it. A change in aperture impacts the shutter speed, but in this mode, you have no control over that. 

Shutter Priority Mode 

 

As you understood from the name, shutter priority mode lets you control the shutter speed, leaving the rest to your camera. Controlling the shutter speed means controlling the length of time for which the shutter will remain open. By taking charge of it, you control the exposure. You should use this mode when you are clicking a movement, such as the flowing river or waterfall. This Shutter Priority allows you to control the camera’s shutter speed, leaving aperture settings up to the camera. I use this setting less frequently than Aperture Priority, but it can be very useful.

Manual Mode 

 

 

You must be already aware of this mode. When you enable it, you can control each and every setting on your own. Contrary to the popular belief, it is not at all important to always shoot in manual mode to yield the best possible results. Nor that expert photographers always use it. However, in some cases, you must use this mode, like for shooting panorama or Time lapse video. It also comes very useful when you shoot at night. 

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.


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If you aspire to click wonderful landscape photos, you need to work on your knowledge of camera settings along with brushing up your photography skills. In camera settings, you may have gathered enough knowledge about how focus, aperture, ISO, etc. work, but if you are unaware of the various camera modes, you will not be able to use your photography skill to the fullest. In this article, you will know about the most used camera modes, how they operate, and when should you set which camera mode. When you know the about the camera modes, and use the right one in the right situation, no one can beat your excellence in photography. 

What Should Be The Camera Mode In Landscape Photography?

Automatic Mode 



You may have heard this advice from experts, "avoid shooting in automatic mode". But when you are a beginner, this automatic mode is the one that lets you shoot comfortably as you do not have to worry about controlling any settings with it. You can work fully on the composition. You are most likely to find this mode as Program or "P" in your camera. When you enable it, your camera automatically selects the aperture and shutter speed. If you feel overwhelmed as a beginner, and learn things slowly and steadily, start with automatic mode. Just position your camera towards your subject and shoot. 

 Aperture Priority Mode 

 

 

In the aperture priority mode, you can have full control over the aperture while leaving the rest. By controlling the aperture (f-stop), you can control how much light you will let enter the sensor. Thereby, you control the depth of field of your image. If you select a narrow aperture, the depth of field will be large that is, most of the foreground and background will be in focus. If you select a wide aperture, the depth of field will be shallow, creating a blurred effect called bokeh. In landscape photography, a large depth of field is majorly created. When you set the aperture priority mode, you can play with the depth of field easily while other factors are taken care of by the camera. One issue with this mode is that you cannot control the shutter speed with it. A change in aperture impacts the shutter speed, but in this mode, you have no control over that. 

Shutter Priority Mode 

 

As you understood from the name, shutter priority mode lets you control the shutter speed, leaving the rest to your camera. Controlling the shutter speed means controlling the length of time for which the shutter will remain open. By taking charge of it, you control the exposure. You should use this mode when you are clicking a movement, such as the flowing river or waterfall. This Shutter Priority allows you to control the camera’s shutter speed, leaving aperture settings up to the camera. I use this setting less frequently than Aperture Priority, but it can be very useful.

Manual Mode 

 

 

You must be already aware of this mode. When you enable it, you can control each and every setting on your own. Contrary to the popular belief, it is not at all important to always shoot in manual mode to yield the best possible results. Nor that expert photographers always use it. However, in some cases, you must use this mode, like for shooting panorama or Time lapse video. It also comes very useful when you shoot at night. 

 

Written By Sanga Basu, Content Writer, WPC.