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This is how you choose your first primary lens

Published by WPC Official Account on Aug'14,2022

0 | 106


This is how you choose your first primary lens

WPC Official Account
0 | 106 | Oct 01, 2022

So, you have decided to give your passion for photography a full-fledged chance and are now looking for your first prime lens. There is always something eloquently special about the first purchase you make in any domain. Especially now that you are making a purchase for your passion, there would be many emotions invested, excitement surging. Thereof, making a decision based on weighing in all the pros and cons may be overlooked by you. 

 

Here are the things you need to keep in mind as you choose your first primary lens. 

 

Decide a niche but keep your options open:

A lot of photographers prefer cameras with lower aperture. Simply put, The lower the aperture is, the more light it would be able to capture.

Sony’s FE 28-70mm kit lens has an aperture of f/3.5 to f/5.6. The more you zoom in, the smaller the widest aperture becomes. This design is great for you if you are restricted on a budget and can not invest anything above the cost of this camera but has a lot of limitations. own size You will not be able to shoot portraits at 70mm with a shallow depth of field. Fully zoomed in at 70mm, the widest aperture available to you will be f/5.6. This camera would not be able to provide a cinematic feel and the blur would not be extremely good to the eyes. A larger aperture also means that when shooting in low light, you don’t have to boost your ISO (introducing noise) or drop your shutter speed (making handheld shots impossible due to motion blur).

The lenses with wider apertures allow more light to enter, hence they are described as “fast”.

 

Settling Between f/1.8-1.4

It is strongly recommended hence that your camera should have at least an aperture of 1.8 to get started with. As your primary lens, you would want something that falls in between a macro lens and an ultrawide lens. While keeping your options is a safe bet, options only tend to cause confusion and delay in making a decision. However, if you are very specific in your head about the niche and are not looking for experimentations but a lens to cater to your specific needs, you can let go of the advice given above. 

 

Our Top Picks:

 

 

  • The Classic 50mm: The classic 50mm lens would never disappoint you and serves as a perfect mid-ground to serve the majority of your needs. The 50mm focal length is thought to be similar to what we see naturally so images tend to correspond closely with how we understand the world. For this reason, 50mm is often called a standard prime.
  • 35mm: Best suited and tailored for your documentary needs if you are into street photography and photo journaling. This should be your choice for your wide-angle niche.
  • 80mm: We have now got into the depth of field and if portraits and macro photography is something that excites you, this lens should be your blind buy. 85mm is regarded as a portrait lens, creating much more separation than 50mm, and creating less distortion, too. 

 

 

There you go:

While the market is flooded with options, you can make an informed choice and rejoice in your passion by choosing a lens from the details mentioned above once you have figured out your needs. Your first lens would always be special to you and to us as well. 


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So, you have decided to give your passion for photography a full-fledged chance and are now looking for your first prime lens. There is always something eloquently special about the first purchase you make in any domain. Especially now that you are making a purchase for your passion, there would be many emotions invested, excitement surging. Thereof, making a decision based on weighing in all the pros and cons may be overlooked by you. 

 

Here are the things you need to keep in mind as you choose your first primary lens. 

 

Decide a niche but keep your options open:

A lot of photographers prefer cameras with lower aperture. Simply put, The lower the aperture is, the more light it would be able to capture.

Sony’s FE 28-70mm kit lens has an aperture of f/3.5 to f/5.6. The more you zoom in, the smaller the widest aperture becomes. This design is great for you if you are restricted on a budget and can not invest anything above the cost of this camera but has a lot of limitations. own size You will not be able to shoot portraits at 70mm with a shallow depth of field. Fully zoomed in at 70mm, the widest aperture available to you will be f/5.6. This camera would not be able to provide a cinematic feel and the blur would not be extremely good to the eyes. A larger aperture also means that when shooting in low light, you don’t have to boost your ISO (introducing noise) or drop your shutter speed (making handheld shots impossible due to motion blur).

The lenses with wider apertures allow more light to enter, hence they are described as “fast”.

 

Settling Between f/1.8-1.4

It is strongly recommended hence that your camera should have at least an aperture of 1.8 to get started with. As your primary lens, you would want something that falls in between a macro lens and an ultrawide lens. While keeping your options is a safe bet, options only tend to cause confusion and delay in making a decision. However, if you are very specific in your head about the niche and are not looking for experimentations but a lens to cater to your specific needs, you can let go of the advice given above. 

 

Our Top Picks:

 

 

  • The Classic 50mm: The classic 50mm lens would never disappoint you and serves as a perfect mid-ground to serve the majority of your needs. The 50mm focal length is thought to be similar to what we see naturally so images tend to correspond closely with how we understand the world. For this reason, 50mm is often called a standard prime.
  • 35mm: Best suited and tailored for your documentary needs if you are into street photography and photo journaling. This should be your choice for your wide-angle niche.
  • 80mm: We have now got into the depth of field and if portraits and macro photography is something that excites you, this lens should be your blind buy. 85mm is regarded as a portrait lens, creating much more separation than 50mm, and creating less distortion, too. 

 

 

There you go:

While the market is flooded with options, you can make an informed choice and rejoice in your passion by choosing a lens from the details mentioned above once you have figured out your needs. Your first lens would always be special to you and to us as well.